ADULT DEPRESSION, SUICIDAL IDEATION AND PERSONALITY

Project Details

Description

This research proposes to examine a theoretically and empirically
derived model for the absence of overt suicidal ideation in persons at risk for
suicide. It is hypothesized that persons low in openness-to-experience (OTE), a
well-validated dimension of personality, who become significantly depressed,
are less likely to report active suicidal ideation, are more likely to
under-report affective symptoms, and are less likely to have their affective
symptoms recognized by members of their social network. These hypotheses will
be assessed in a sample of 350 depressed psychiatric inpatients, 50 years or
older. Participants will include 175 persons identified as depressed, with
active or passive suicidal ideation; and 175 depressed persons with no active
or passive suicidal ideation. Levels of OTE will be compared between these two
groups and correlated with symptom reporting, operationalized as the ratio of
self-reported affective and somatic symptoms to observer-rated symptoms; and
with symptom recognition, operationalized as the difference between the
self-report and informant reports of affective and somatic symptoms.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/15/008/31/05

Funding

  • National Institute of Mental Health: $318,092.00
  • National Institute of Mental Health: $381,976.00
  • National Institute of Mental Health: $62,919.00
  • National Institute of Mental Health: $319,000.00
  • National Institute of Mental Health: $319,000.00

ASJC

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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