BREEDING AND GENETICS OF FRUIT-ROT RESISTANCE AND POLYPHENOLICS IN THE AMERICAN CRANBERRY

Project Details

Description

The ultimate goal of this proposed research and development project is to develop broadly adapted horticulturally superior cultivars of American cranberry with increased levels of durable field fruit-rot resistance (FFRR), while concurrently maintaining and ultimately enhancing the polyphenolic (flavonoid) profiles beneficial for human health. Current work at our research center has found differences in field fruit rot resistance and evidence that resistance is heritable. The three major polyphenolic classes in cranberry, proanthocyanidins, anthocyanins, and flavonols, are all being intensely investigated for their potential benefit to human health. In addition, we suspect there may be an association between polyphenolic profiles and FFRR, especially proanthocyanidin during flowering and early fruit development. Understanding the mechanism(s) of fruit rot resistance and identifying molecular markers for resistance would greatly facilitate our goal and future breeding efforts. New cultivars being developed need to be evaluated in the broadest array of climates as possible. Washington State offers the most contrasting environment to New Jersey, having a moderate climate in winter and the lowest light and temperature conditions during the growing season. In addition, about one-third of Washington State's crop is dedicated to fresh market, and good storage life attributes are required. The outreach objectives of this proposal provide demonstration plantings in NJ, WI and WA, where growers will have the opportunity to observe experimental cultivars growing side by side with standard cultivars under normal cranberry bed management conditions.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date5/1/0812/31/09

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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