COCAINE: STRIATAL AND ACCUMBENS NEURONS AND BEHAVIOR

Project Details

Description

The objective of this proposed research is to study cocaine's
effects on dopamine-sensitive neurons that mediate the effects of
cocaine on behavior. Extracellular single-unit recordings will be
obtained from the striatum and nucleus accumbens of freely
moving rats. Cocaine will be administered both locally, by
microiontophoresis, and systemically, by intraperitoneal injection.
An important advantage of these studies is that they will be
performed without the contaminating effects of anesthesia or
paralysis. Instead, recordings will be obtained during the
behaviors produced by cocaine (e.g., locomotion). Since
locomotion itself, is correlated with changes in neural activity in
these structures, a 30 minute control recording following saline
injection will be obtained during locomotion on a treadmill. Dose-
response curves will then be constructed of neural activity during
treadmill locomotion following cocaine. Videotape recordings synchronized with the computer's acquisition
of neural activity will be analyzed to isolate cocaine-induced
behaviors (stereotypy) that might be correlated with neural
activity and thus obscure more direct actions of the drug. The
tremendous advantage of microiontophoresis is that cocaine's
actions on recorded neurons can be observed directly, without
contributions from feedback from the motor behaviors described
above, or from activity in other brain areas that project to the
striatum and accumbens. In addition to studying cocaine's effects
on tonic firing rate, phasic signals will be produced by several
methods, including electrical activation of the neocortical and
hippocampal synaptic inputs to these structures, as well as
sensory-evoked responses. All these patterns of activity will be
examined, 1) in terms of cocaine's effects on dopamine-mediated
neural activity, 2) in dopamine-depleted animals following 6-
OHDA, and 3) in animals chronically treated with cocaine. These
studies should have a major impact on our understanding of brain
mechanisms related to cocaine's acute and chronic behavioral
effects.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/872/28/02

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $144,347.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $140,462.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $138,314.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $114,897.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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