DEVELOPING AND EVALUATING REDUCED-RISK MANAGEMENT AND PHENOLOGY PROGRAMS FOR FRUIT PESTS

Project Details

Description

For the past 40 or so years, much research in applied entomology has been focused on developing and refining integrated pest management (IPM) programs. The goal of such programs is to apply a range of management tactics based on pest biology and monitoring tools. While the eastern tree fruit system still maintains a heavy reliance on synthetic insecticides, they were applied based on degree-day models and trap thresholds, using reduced-risk compounds, with resistance management and conservation of natural enemies in mind and in harmony with non-insecticide tools such as mating disruption. The success in IPM programs lies in a more precise approach to pest management with the integration on non-insecticide management. Orchard crops in particular are ideal models for IPM systems because it is a perennial system that permits a systems-level approach.Recently, invasive pests such as brown marmorated stink bug and spotted wing drosophila have disrupted well researched IPM programs, especially in fruit systems. The proposed research and extension project will conduct research on insect biology and behavior on key fruit pests, including invasive species, to develop or refine IPM programs and reduce insecticide use. Research findings will be communicated to growers, extension educators and researchers through traditional extension activities, technology based methods such as blogs and smart-phone applications, and peer-reviewed publications.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date12/19/139/30/18

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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