Early childhood development in relation to intimate partner violence during pregn

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is a significant public health problem. Approximately 324,000 IPV victimizations occur during pregnancy each year. Previous studies have indicated that abused pregnant women were at higher risk for adverse maternal and birth outcomes. However, little, if any, research has looked at the impact of abuse during pregnancy on early childhood development. The broad objective of the proposed study is to assess the long-term effect of IPV during pregnancy on early childhood health. Specific aims: (1) to examine the association of IPV with birth outcomes among pregnant women. We hypothesize that abused pregnant women will have poorer birth outcomes compared to non-abused pregnant women;(2) to assess the effect of IPV during pregnancy on early childhood health from birth to 3 years. We hypothesize that children of abused pregnant women will have poorer health status than those of non-abused pregnant women. This study will use a retrospective matched cohort study design. We will analyze data from chart reviews of a random sample of 1,500 pregnant women who were seen between 1999 and 2004 at an urban university affiliated prenatal clinic, and who gave birth at the on-site hospital, and whose newborns were patients at on-site pediatric clinics. The standard of care for all pregnant visits is to be screened for IPV at their first prenatal visit and annual/postpartum visit. We will randomly select 500 abused pregnant women and each victim will be matched on age to 2 randomly selected non-victims. We will then link mother and infant charts. Outcome measures for specific aim (1) are preterm delivery, neonatal intensive care, low birth weight, and postpartum depression. Outcome measures for specific aim (2) are child's growth, immunization, child development, and child abuse and/or neglect. By better understanding IPV during pregnancy, and its relationship to adverse birth outcomes and early childhood health, we can develop better interventions. By identifying children at risk, we can prevent negative health outcomes. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is a significant public health problem. This study will examine the association of IPV during pregnancy with birth outcomes and childhood health from birth to 3 years. By filling the gap in our understanding of the role of IPV during pregnancy and its long-term effects on early childhood health, we can develop better interventions for abused women and their children.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/5/0912/31/11

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $78,000.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $77,220.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)

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