EARS: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: BIG BANDWIDTH: FINDING ANOMALOUS NEEDLES IN THE SPECTRUM HAYSTACK

Project Details

Description

Objective:The objective of the proposed project is to explore the problem of scanning large amounts of spectrum in order to detect anomalous usage of that spectrum. The project will examine spectrum scanning using a single spectrum sensor and using multiple spectrum sensors. The approach will involve using game theoretic formulations that allow for the determination of scanning strategies that give an optimal likelihood of detecting an adversarial or accidental misuse of spectrum in terms of the bandwidth that can be scanned in a single scan and the bandwidth that an anomalous activity might involve. The optimization of strategies are complemented by techniques that increase the amount of spectrum that can be scanned in a single scan, and spectrum mapping algorithms that estimate the received power levels at arbitrary spatial locations.Intellectual merit:The intellectual merit of the proposed effort stems from the pulling together of a mixture of technologies from different fields, including game theory, signal processing, security, wireless communications, and RF photonics to address the challenging problem of detecting and preventing anomalous spectrum activity across a wide swath of bandwidth. Broader impacts:The broader impacts of the proposed effort will include the cross-pollination between different disciplines, such as game theory, security, photonics and signal processing. Additionally, the project will guide the development of graduate and undergraduate students at both participating institutions, giving the students new tools with which to contribute to wireless and optical communications. Finally, new interdisciplinary curricula will be developed as part of the effort.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/1312/31/15

Funding

  • National Science Foundation (National Science Foundation (NSF))

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