EPIGENETIC TRANSGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR EXPOSURE IN THE OVARY

Project Details

Description

An animal's epigenome plays a significant role in the expression of its genome. Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as the pesticide methoxychlor, during in utero or early postnatal developmental periods can alter the epigenome in a delayed manner. Importantly, these alterations can be passed on to unexposed offspring through inheritance of epigenetic mechanisms (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). One of the goals of the proposed research is to identify alterations in the epigenome due to developmental exposures to EDCs that lead to alterations in the expression of the genome. Another goal is to understand the mechanisms by which these compounds affect the germ cell epigenome, which can be transmitted to subsequent generations. A better mechanistic understanding of the delayed and transgenerational epigenetic effects of EDCs will improve our basic understanding of how the environment affects the epigenome-which, in turn, affects the genome. Our results will be published as peer-reviewed journal articles and other publications. In the long term, such an understanding would have potential implications for reproductive health and animal productivity because it can help us prevent and ameliorate the effects of EDCs on humans and other animals.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date5/1/114/30/16

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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