EXPANDING THE USE OF SEED HEAT TREATMENT FOR MANAGEMENT OF BACTERIAL DISEASES OF TOMATO AND OTHER VEGETABLE CROP IN THE MID ATLANTIC REGION

Project Details

Description

Bacterial canker, bacterial speck, and bacterial spot are serious diseases of fresh-market tomatoes in the Northeast. The three largest tomato producing states in the Northeast (NJ, NY and PA) harvest over 8500 acres of fresh market tomatoes annually with a value of over 75 million dollars. Additionally, the eastern shore of Virginia harvests approximately 5,000 A of fresh-market tomatoes on an annual basis. Much of the fresh market tomato crop in the mid-Atlantic and NE region is sold locally (i.e., in the northeast corridor) and is an important crop sold in farmers markets, as well as, regional and local grocery stores. Within the past decade, the incidence of bacterial diseases of tomato including bacterial canker, spot and speck have increased throughout the region. Importantly, the current management practices for the control of bacterial diseases in tomato, especially canker, have not been effective, or are completely absent, in some regions of the Northeast. The objectives and anticipated impacts of this project are to demonstrate and promote via train-the-trainer workshops the technique of seed heat treatment for managing important bacterial diseases of tomato and other vegetable crops to extension personnel, crop advisors, seedsmen and organic and conventional vegetable growers in the mid-Atlantic and surrounding region. Vegetable growers in the mid-Atlantic and surrounding region are the primary beneficiaries of this extension project. This project will also allow mid-Atlantic and surrounding extension personnel to better serve their constituents through the introduction and demonstration of a new technique to add to their IPM toolbox to help control economically-important bacterial diseases of tomato. Importantly, the same seed heat-treatment techniques used in this project on tomato seed can easily be expanded to help reduce potential seed-borne diseases on many different vegetable crops such as bacterial spot of pepper, downy mildew on various vegetable crops, and on black-rot of crucifer crops. The appropriate treatment time and temperature for killing pathogens without adversely affecting seed germination has already been determined for several vegetable crops in addition to tomato, including pepper, carrot and cruciferous crops.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/108/31/14

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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