EXTEND AND MAXIMIZE THE POST HARVEST QUALITY OF HIGH VALUE AND PERISHABLE CROPS

Project Details

Description

Small fruit and cut flowers are important horticultural commodities in the US. The annual retail trade in floricultural products is a $32 billion industry. Most cut-flowers sold in the US are grown in Columbia and Ecuador and must be shipped to the US and distributed. Cut flowers are a highly perishable commodity and methods to reduce losses due to fungal disease and senescence during shipping is vital. The small fruit industry is likewise a significant horticultural industry in the US. Strawberries are a $2.3 billion industry. Most fruit are consumed domestically, but are shipped largely from CA and FL throughout the country with a significant export market in Canada. Blueberries are also consumed domestically but with the fresh market industry localized in just a few states (NJ, MI. OR, WA), fruit are shipped nationwide, although there were also 36,000 metric tons exported in 2011. If global export and import markets are to be expanded, shipping and storage of these high value but perishable commodities will require new methods to control disease and senescence of fruits and flowers. This project addresses NIFA priorities 1. Global Food Security and Hunger and 5. Food Safety by developing organic methods to expand the trade in fresh fruit and flowers, increasing incomes to farmers and workers worldwide, and in a way that reduces microbial contamination of these products.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date4/1/133/31/18

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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