FISH, FISHING, AND RISK TO ECO-RECEPTORS AND HUMANS IN COASTAL NEW JERSEY

Project Details

Description

Most states are facing an environmental situation in which contaminants are increasing, human populations are increasing, habitat for wildlife is decreasing, and human and ecological health risk is increasing. This project will examine the risk to eco-receptors and humans from contaminants in fish. This entails understanding how contaminants (mercury, lead, cadmium) move through the food chain to reach top level predators (birds, fish, humans), and what the risk is. For humans, it also involves understanding consumption patterns and fishing behavior. We will collect fish and other biota to examine levels of heavy metals, interview people to determine their fishing behavior and consumption patterns, and determin risk to people and other top level predators. People cannot make informed decisions about what species of fish to eat unless they understand the levels of contaminants in those foods, and how mercury bioaccumulates in different species of fish. Armed with such information people can choose what fish to eat, given their own status (male, female, pregnant, age), and their risk levels
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date8/1/097/31/14

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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