IMPROVING FOREST RESILIENCE IN RESPONSE TO CRITICAL ECOLOGICAL STRESSORS: DEER, INVASIVE PLANT SPECIES, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Project Details

Description

Many forests are failing to regenerate, make new individuals, because of damage to seedlings by a huge population of deer and the abundance of invasive plants sweeping through the region. Many economically important trees are at risk, as is the quality of habitat around these trees. Also, climate change, especially summer drought, is expected to increase tree mortality and decrease the initiation rate of new seedlings. If we can better understand pragmatic ways to decrease the impact of these stressors, we can improve forest products and the ecological services such as ground water protection and air quality that woodlots give us. Our experiments in the field, at an ancient, publically owned forest near the university, will isolate and measure the effect of eliminating deer damage and invasive plant removal, measured against the condition of adjacent control areas, to try to give us new ideas forimproving and sustainingforest resources. These results will be communicated in scientific and public media to increase information and awareness of the problems facing our woodlots and the proactive steps needed to increase their value.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/11/136/30/16

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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