MODULATING MOLECULAR MOBILITY IN AMORPHOUS SOLIDS TO ENHANCE FOOD STABILITY

Project Details

Description

The stability and thus shelf-life of solid (dry or frozen) foods is determined by the rates of specific chemical reactions and physical changes. These rates are in turn controlled by the local structure and molecular mobility of the amorphous (non-crystalline) solid phase of sugars, carbohydrates, and proteins. This project will investigate how specific and judicious manipulation of the composition of amorphous carbohydate matrixes, by the addition of sugars, sugar alcohols, and other food grade components, can lower the molecular mobility, slow the rates of specific chemical reactions and physical processes, and thus increase the stability and shelf-life of solid food products. Specific studies will try to determine the molecular mechanisms that lead to increase in stability. This work will assist in generating guidelines that can be used to develop specific formulations that enhance the shelf life and long term stability of human foods, animal feeds, and perhaps even pharmaceutical products.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/1/088/31/13

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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