MONITORING FOR RESISTANCE DEVELOPMENT IN THE BROWN MARMORATED STINK BUG IN NEW JERSEY AND THE UNITED STATES

Project Details

Description

The management of invasive species is a complex process because some of the same characteristics that make a species a successful invader also make it a pervasive and damaging pest. In an attempt to quickly mitigate the impact of a new pest, agricultural management programs often rely heavily on the use of insecticides. Unfortunately this practice can lead to insecticide resistance or the ability of the pest to withstand the lethal effects of an insecticide. This is especially possible for polyphagous species, such as the brown marmorated stink bug, that may utilize both treated agricultural crops and untreated wild hosts. This effect can be detected and monitored by careful sampling to determine the underlying levels of insecticide resistance in the invading pest and can be used to implement insecticide resistance programs before resistance occurs in the invaded region. The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is a significant economic pest in vegetables, tree fruit and row crops in the eastern US, whose population densities and geographic spread continue to increase. BMSB populations are currently increasing in agriculturally important states such as California, Oregon and Washington. If they increase to levels seen in the eastern US significant yield losses will occur. Thus, BMSB poses a significant threat to sustainable New Jersey and American agriculture.I plan to monitor the development of insecticide resistance in BMSB by collecting adults from different areas of the country where they are and are not currently a problem. These adults will be exposed in the laboratory to varying levels of specific insecticide to determine current levels of lethality. Based on the results found, I will develop BMSB management programs that address this issue and inform the agricultural community of these programs. Successful tracking of potential resistance will insure the use of IPM procedures that are appropriate for individual areas and crops that should result in reduced insecticide use. Added benefits include increased worker safety and a safer food supply due reductions in the use of insecticides.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/1512/31/19

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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