Mother/Pregnant Teen Communication and Depression

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The purpose of the study is to examine the role of mother-adolescent communication in easing the transition to parenthood for low-income pregnant Mexican American adolescents who utilize the Women Infants and Children (WIC) nutrition and health program in Los Angeles County. Despite the fact that Mexican American adolescents are at greatest risk for teen pregnancy, there is relatively little research on the ways in which these families discuss the issues surrounding pregnancy and whether or not communication with mothers serves as a protective factor in the postpartum adjustment of the adolescent. There is evidence to suggest that a supportive and open relationship with mothers can be helpful to adolescents in terms of their parenting and their adjustment, and observations of communication can help to further elucidate this relation. The proposed study will examine observed mother-adolescent communication (discussions about sex and the pregnancy) as it predicts adolescent depression, parenting beliefs, involvement in parenting, and responsible sexual behavior. Conversations will be coded for maternal communication style and the content of the conversations. Pregnant adolescents and their mothers will be assessed prenatally and then again three months after giving birth. The study will pay particular attention to the cultural context and the role of acculturation, as it is likely to affect the ways in which families communicate about sensitive issues and may also have some relationship to our adolescent outcomes. The moderating role of adolescent autonomy and social support from mothers will be also examined.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/6/028/31/05

Funding

  • National Institute of Mental Health: $24,835.00
  • National Institute of Mental Health: $27,451.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint

Explore the research topics touched on by this project. These labels are generated based on the underlying awards/grants. Together they form a unique fingerprint.