PLASTICITY AND REGENERATION OF RETINAL SYNAPSES

Project Details

Description

DESCRIPTION (Adapted from applicant's abstract): The photoreceptor cell is
affected by a variety of genetic diseases and trauma. Both its outer
segment and the synaptic terminal respond to these pathological conditions.
This proposal examines the plasticity of the photoreceptor ribbon synapse
and its ability to regenerate and has the following aims: (1) to localize
the calcium channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor; (2) to test whether
synaptic plasticity is controlled by calcium signals and vesicle recycling;
and (3) to examine for inhibitory interaction between adult neurons that may
limit regeneration and recovery of synaptic function. Confocal laser
scanning and electron microscopy will be used on isolated photoreceptors in
conjunction with fluorescent dihydropyridines, inhibitors of protein
synthesis, and markers of cell organelles, to examine structural plasticity.
Creation of groups of retinal neurons in culture by micromanipulation with
optical tweezers, followed by conventional and video time-lapse microscopy,
will test potential repulsive and attractant cell-mediated forces during
regeneration. The projects explore possible mechanisms involved in axonal
retraction and neuritic outgrowth seen in retinal detachment and retinitis
pigmentosa, respectively. Understanding the cell biology of the ribbon
synapse may help restore or preserve normal neurotransmission in retinal
disease.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date7/1/987/31/12

Funding

  • National Eye Institute: $319,859.00
  • National Eye Institute: $334,890.00
  • National Eye Institute: $320,639.00
  • National Eye Institute: $341,654.00
  • National Eye Institute: $348,200.00
  • National Eye Institute
  • National Eye Institute
  • National Eye Institute: $344,280.00
  • National Eye Institute: $349,875.00
  • National Eye Institute: $349,875.00
  • National Eye Institute: $349,875.00

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Ophthalmology
  • Cell Biology

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