THE ROLE OF MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS IN THE GEOCHEMICAL CYCLING OF MERCURY

Project Details

Description

The proposed project will enhance the vitality, health, sustainability and overall quality of life in the nation and in New Jersey by developing and delivering practical solutions to a myriad of problems that are associated with the toxicity and environmental distribution of mercury. These solutions will be relevant to the safety of the nation's food supply in light of anticipated rising temperatures and their effects on the dynamics and kinetics of mercury cycling in various environments. The toxicity of mercury is greatly dependent on its chemical form by which it is present in the environment; the organic form, methylmercury, is the most toxic due to its bioaccumulation and biomagnifications in food chains. Mercury enters the environment in its inorganic form; processes within the environment convert it to the methylated form that enhances bioavailability. Microbial transformations play a central role in these processes by methylating mercury and by performing other reactions that modulate the environmental production of this toxic substance. The understanding of these processes resulting from the proposed project will serve as the scientific basis for remedial action toward the reduction of mercury contamination, and will provide knowledge to support environmental management decision-making toward minimizing the impact of mercury in contaminated environments.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date10/1/119/30/16

Funding

  • National Institute of Food and Agriculture (National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA))

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