A Bacillus subtilis regulatory gene product for genetic competence and sporulation resembles sensor protein members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems

Y. Weinrauch, R. Penchev, E. Dubnau, E. Smith, David Dubnau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A Bacillus subtilis gene, required for genetic competence, was identified immediately upstream from the previously characterized gene comA. The comA gene product has been found to exhibit amino acid sequence similarity to the so-called effector class of signal-transduction proteins. DNA sequencing of the new determinant, named comP, revealed that the carboxy-terminal domain of the predicted ComP protein is similar in amino acid sequence to that of several sensor members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems. The predicted amino-terminal domain contains several hydrophobic segments, postulated to be membrane-spanning. In vitro-derived comP disruptions are epistatic on the expression of all late competence genes tested, including comG, comC, comD, and comE, but not on expression of the early gene comB. Although comA has its own promoter, some transcription of comA, especially later in growth, occurs via readthrough from comP sequences. A roughly twofold epistatic effect of a comP disruption was noted on the downstream comA determinant, possibly due to interruption of readthrough transcription from comP to comA. Overexpression of comA fully restored competence to a comP mutant, providing evidence that ComA acts after ComP, and consistent with a role for the latter protein in activation of the former, possibly by phosphorylation. ComP probably is involved in transmitting information concerning the nutritional status of the medium, particularly the presence of nitrogen- and carbon-containing nutrients. ComP was also shown to play a role in sporulation, at least partly interchangeable with that of SpoIIJ, another putative sensor protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)860-872
Number of pages13
JournalGenes and Development
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Bacterial Proteins
Regulator Genes
Coma
Bacillus subtilis
Mental Competency
Signal Transduction
Genes
Amino Acid Sequence
Proteins
Comb and Wattles
Nutritional Status
DNA Sequence Analysis
Nitrogen
Carbon
Phosphorylation
Gene Expression
Food
Membranes
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Developmental Biology

Keywords

  • Genetic competence
  • global regulation
  • signal transduction
  • sporulation

Cite this

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abstract = "A Bacillus subtilis gene, required for genetic competence, was identified immediately upstream from the previously characterized gene comA. The comA gene product has been found to exhibit amino acid sequence similarity to the so-called effector class of signal-transduction proteins. DNA sequencing of the new determinant, named comP, revealed that the carboxy-terminal domain of the predicted ComP protein is similar in amino acid sequence to that of several sensor members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems. The predicted amino-terminal domain contains several hydrophobic segments, postulated to be membrane-spanning. In vitro-derived comP disruptions are epistatic on the expression of all late competence genes tested, including comG, comC, comD, and comE, but not on expression of the early gene comB. Although comA has its own promoter, some transcription of comA, especially later in growth, occurs via readthrough from comP sequences. A roughly twofold epistatic effect of a comP disruption was noted on the downstream comA determinant, possibly due to interruption of readthrough transcription from comP to comA. Overexpression of comA fully restored competence to a comP mutant, providing evidence that ComA acts after ComP, and consistent with a role for the latter protein in activation of the former, possibly by phosphorylation. ComP probably is involved in transmitting information concerning the nutritional status of the medium, particularly the presence of nitrogen- and carbon-containing nutrients. ComP was also shown to play a role in sporulation, at least partly interchangeable with that of SpoIIJ, another putative sensor protein.",
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A Bacillus subtilis regulatory gene product for genetic competence and sporulation resembles sensor protein members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems. / Weinrauch, Y.; Penchev, R.; Dubnau, E.; Smith, E.; Dubnau, David.

In: Genes and Development, Vol. 4, No. 5, 01.01.1990, p. 860-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - A Bacillus subtilis regulatory gene product for genetic competence and sporulation resembles sensor protein members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems

AU - Weinrauch, Y.

AU - Penchev, R.

AU - Dubnau, E.

AU - Smith, E.

AU - Dubnau, David

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N2 - A Bacillus subtilis gene, required for genetic competence, was identified immediately upstream from the previously characterized gene comA. The comA gene product has been found to exhibit amino acid sequence similarity to the so-called effector class of signal-transduction proteins. DNA sequencing of the new determinant, named comP, revealed that the carboxy-terminal domain of the predicted ComP protein is similar in amino acid sequence to that of several sensor members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems. The predicted amino-terminal domain contains several hydrophobic segments, postulated to be membrane-spanning. In vitro-derived comP disruptions are epistatic on the expression of all late competence genes tested, including comG, comC, comD, and comE, but not on expression of the early gene comB. Although comA has its own promoter, some transcription of comA, especially later in growth, occurs via readthrough from comP sequences. A roughly twofold epistatic effect of a comP disruption was noted on the downstream comA determinant, possibly due to interruption of readthrough transcription from comP to comA. Overexpression of comA fully restored competence to a comP mutant, providing evidence that ComA acts after ComP, and consistent with a role for the latter protein in activation of the former, possibly by phosphorylation. ComP probably is involved in transmitting information concerning the nutritional status of the medium, particularly the presence of nitrogen- and carbon-containing nutrients. ComP was also shown to play a role in sporulation, at least partly interchangeable with that of SpoIIJ, another putative sensor protein.

AB - A Bacillus subtilis gene, required for genetic competence, was identified immediately upstream from the previously characterized gene comA. The comA gene product has been found to exhibit amino acid sequence similarity to the so-called effector class of signal-transduction proteins. DNA sequencing of the new determinant, named comP, revealed that the carboxy-terminal domain of the predicted ComP protein is similar in amino acid sequence to that of several sensor members of the bacterial two-component signal-transduction systems. The predicted amino-terminal domain contains several hydrophobic segments, postulated to be membrane-spanning. In vitro-derived comP disruptions are epistatic on the expression of all late competence genes tested, including comG, comC, comD, and comE, but not on expression of the early gene comB. Although comA has its own promoter, some transcription of comA, especially later in growth, occurs via readthrough from comP sequences. A roughly twofold epistatic effect of a comP disruption was noted on the downstream comA determinant, possibly due to interruption of readthrough transcription from comP to comA. Overexpression of comA fully restored competence to a comP mutant, providing evidence that ComA acts after ComP, and consistent with a role for the latter protein in activation of the former, possibly by phosphorylation. ComP probably is involved in transmitting information concerning the nutritional status of the medium, particularly the presence of nitrogen- and carbon-containing nutrients. ComP was also shown to play a role in sporulation, at least partly interchangeable with that of SpoIIJ, another putative sensor protein.

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