Abstract

The daily activity of the fruit fly Drosophila is controlled by both a "morning" and an "evening" circadian clock. In this issue Stoleru et al. (2007) demonstrate that day length determines which clock dominates the neural circuitry governing circadian behavior. Thus, these findings suggest a mechanism by which the system for circadian timing adapts to changes in the seasons to impose appropriate rhythms of daily activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-23
Number of pages3
JournalCell
Volume129
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 6 2007

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Circadian Clocks
Clocks
Fruits
Drosophila

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

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author = "Isaac Edery",
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doi = "10.1016/j.cell.2007.03.020",
language = "English (US)",
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A Blend of Two Circadian Clocks, Seasoned to Perfection. / Edery, Isaac.

In: Cell, Vol. 129, No. 1, 06.04.2007, p. 21-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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AU - Edery, Isaac

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