A high-salt meal does not augment blood pressure responses during maximal exercise

Kamila U. Migdal, Austin T. Robinson, Joseph C. Watso, Matthew C. Babcock, Jorge M. Serrador, William B. Farquhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Augmented blood pressure (BP) responses during exercise are predictive of future cardiovascular disease. High dietary sodium (Na+) increases BP responses during static exercise. It remains unclear if high dietary Na+ augments BP responses during dynamic exercise. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an acute high-Na+ meal would augment BP responses during dynamic exercise. Twenty adults (10 male/10 female; age, 26 ± 5 years; BP, 105 ± 10/57 ±6mmHg)were given a high-Na+ meal (HSM; 1495 mg Na+) and a low-Na+ meal (LSM; 138 mg Na+) separated by at least 1 week, in random order. Serum Na+ and plasma osmolality were measured. Eighty minutes following the meal, participants completed a graded-maximal exercise protocol on a cycle ergometer. Heart rate, beat-by-beat BP, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, and manual BP were measured at rest and during exercise. Both serum Na+ (HSM: ∆1.6 ± 2.0 vs LSM: ∆1.1 ± 1.8 mmol/L, P = 0.0002) and plasma osmolality (HSM: ∆3.0 ± 4.5 vs LSM: ∆2.0 ± 4.2 mOsm/(kg·H2O), P = 0.01) were higher following the HSM. However, the HSM did not augment BP during peak exercise (systolic BP: HSM: 170 ± 23 vs LSM: 171 ± 21 mm Hg, P = 0.81). These findings suggest that an acute high-salt meal does not augment BP responses during dynamic exercise in adults. Novelty • The high-salt meal increased serum sodium and plasma osmolality compared with the low-salt meal. • The high-salt meal did not augment blood pressure responses during maximal dynamic exercise. This is important as augmented blood pressure responses during exercise put individuals at greater risk for development of cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-128
Number of pages6
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2020

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Physiology (medical)

Keywords

  • Acute
  • Blood pressure
  • Exercise
  • Osmolality
  • Sex differences
  • Sodium

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