A high-titer, high-thermal-amplitude autoanti-B associated with acrocyanosis but no obvious hemolytic anemia

Patricia A. Arndt, Jennifer B. Do, George Garratty, Mercy A. Kuriyan, Roger K. Strair, Akhil Baranwal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: ABO autoantibodies are rare. Most reported examples have been antibodies with 4°C titers not greater than 256 in patients without apparent hemolytic anemia. Most high-titer, high-thermal-amplitude, complement-activating cold agglutinins are associated with hemolytic anemia. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A 52-year-old man presented with acrocyanosis and mild small-vessel brain disease, but no evidence of obvious hemolytic anemia. Regular plasmapheresis treatment was helpful in relieving the clinical symptoms associated with acrocyanosis. Serologic methods were used to study the patient's RBCs and sera. RESULTS: The patient's RBCs were strongly reactive with anti-C3 and anti-IgM and weakly reactive with anti-IgA. The patient's serum contained a high-titer, high-thermal-amplitude, IgMκ autoanti-B, capable of activating complement in vitro. CONCLUSION: A patient with a powerful ABO autoantibody is described. This patient had acrocyanosis but did not appear to have an obvious hemolytic anemia. This case is a good example of the lack of correlation between in vitro serologic tests and in vivo reactions in individual patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1133-1137
Number of pages5
JournalTransfusion
Volume43
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2003

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

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