A microfluidic in-line ELISA for measuring secreted protein under perfusion

Qiyue Luan, Stacey Cahoon, Agnes Wu, Shyam Sundhar Bale, Martin Yarmush, Abhinav Bhushan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent progress in the development of microfluidic microphysiological systems such as ‘organs-on-chips’ and microfabricated cell culture is geared to simulate organ-level physiology. These tissue models leverage microengineering technologies that provide capabilities of presenting cultured cells with input signals in a more physiologically relevant context such as perfused flow. Proteins that are secreted from cells have important information about the health of the cells. Techniques to quantify cellular proteins include mass spectrometry to ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Although our capability to perturb the cells in the microphysiological systems with varying inputs is well established, we lack the tools to monitor in-line the cellular responses. User intervention for sample collection and off-site is cumbersome, causes delays in obtaining results, and is especially expensive because of collection, storage, and offline processing of the samples, and in many case, technically impractical to carry out because of limitated sample volumes. To address these shortcomings, we report the development of an ELISA that is carried out in-line under perfusion within a microfluidic device. Using this assay, we measured the albumin secreted from perfused hepatocytes without and under stimulation by IL-6. Since the method is based on a sandwich ELISA, we envision broad application of this technology to not just organs-on-chips but also to characterizing the temporal release and measurement of soluble factors and response to drugs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101
JournalBiomedical Microdevices
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Microfluidics
Assays
Enzymes
Perfusion
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Lab-On-A-Chip Devices
Proteins
Technology
Hepatocytes
Albumins
Cultured Cells
Interleukin-6
Mass Spectrometry
Physiology
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell culture
Mass spectrometry
Cells
Health
Tissue

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Molecular Biology

Keywords

  • Cellular response
  • ELISA
  • In-line measurement
  • Microfluidics

Cite this

Luan, Qiyue ; Cahoon, Stacey ; Wu, Agnes ; Bale, Shyam Sundhar ; Yarmush, Martin ; Bhushan, Abhinav. / A microfluidic in-line ELISA for measuring secreted protein under perfusion. In: Biomedical Microdevices. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 4.
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A microfluidic in-line ELISA for measuring secreted protein under perfusion. / Luan, Qiyue; Cahoon, Stacey; Wu, Agnes; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Yarmush, Martin; Bhushan, Abhinav.

In: Biomedical Microdevices, Vol. 19, No. 4, 101, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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