A New Method to Treat Asthma and Allergic Reaction

Mark Siracusa (Inventor)

Research output: Innovation

Abstract

PBS                                                                             Peptide Intranasal peptide treatment inhibits ILC2-dependent mucus production Invention Summary: Although most patients with asthma respond to regular inhaled glucocorticoid (corticosteroid) therapy, 5% to 25% of people with asthma have more severe disease and do not respond to current treatments. T helper type 2 cells (TH2) and Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are critical regulators of inflammatory responses in the context of multiple disease states including allergies and asthma. Most recently it was reported that ILCs are not responsive to typical steroid treatments making them a drug target for severe and steroid resistant asthma. This invention disclosed a new approach to treat type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation by targeting both TH2 cells and ILCs. This method can be used to treat inflammatory disorders, including asthma, allergic reaction and chronic tissue fibrosis. It has strong potential to treat steroid resistant asthma. Rutgers investigators have demonstrated that a short peptide is sufficient to inhibit TH2 cells and ILC2 activation and cytokine production. They have screened and identified a set of short peptides as inhibitors of TH2 cells and ILC2 activation and cytokine production. The peptides can be developed as drug candidates for severe asthma and have strong potential to treat steroid resistant asthma and chronic lung fibrosis. Advantages: - Peptide synthesis is simple and cost effective - Primary or adjunct therapy to treat patients that do not respond to current glucocorticoid (corticosteroid) therapy. Market Applications - A biologic therapy for the treatment of asthma - A biologic therapy for the treatment of type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and tissue fibrosis. Intellectual Property & Development Status: Patent pending. Available for licensing or collaboration
Original languageEnglish (US)
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2020

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