A new role for orthopaedic surgeons: ongoing changes, lessons learned, and perspectives from a level I trauma center during the COVID-19 pandemic

Dominick V. Congiusta, Katie Otero, Joseph Ippolito, Jennifer Thomson, Kathleen S. Beebe

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has redefined global health care. With almost 13 million confirmed cases worldwide, medical professionals have been forced to modify their practice to take care of an expanded, critically ill population. Institutions have been challenged to implement innovative ways to maximize the utility and the safety of residents and personnel. Guided by lessons learned from prior mass causalities, wars, and previous pandemics, adjustments have been made in order to provide optimal care for all patients while still protecting limited resources and the lives of health care workers. Specialists who are trained in the management of lethal aspects of this disease continue to have a high demand and obvious role. Orthopedic surgeons, with ill-defined roles, have been redeployed to manage complex medical problems. Still, the need to manage trauma, fractures, infections, tumors, and dislocations remains a necessity. Various innovative measures have been taken to maximize the utility and safety of residents in the inpatient and outpatient setting. Commonalities to most measures and distinct changes in practice philosophy can be identified and applied to both current and future pandemic responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1951-1956
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • Narrative Review
  • academic
  • education
  • orthopaedic surgeons
  • pandemic
  • residency

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