A Note On The Changing Geography Of Cancer Mortality Within Metropolitan Regions Of The United States

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Abstract

An investigation made of the geography of cancer mortality rates within the most populous metropolitan regions of the United States and the New Jersey-New York-Philadelphia metropolitan corridor shows that during the early 1950s, as expected, central city counties had substantially higher cancer mortality rates, especially respiratory and digestive, than did suburbs. Two decades later, differences between the central cities and the suburbs had narrowed and sometimes disappeared.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-420
Number of pages10
JournalDemography
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1981

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography

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