A randomized trial of leukocyte-depleted platelet transfusion to modify alloimmunization in patients with leukemia

C. A. Schiffer, J. P. Dutcher, J. Aisner, D. Hogge, P. H. Wiernik, J. P. Reilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

115 Scopus citations

Abstract

In an effort to determine whether the use of leukocyte (WBC) depleted platelets could modify the development of alloimmunization, 98 adult patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia receiving initial induction therapy were randomized to receive standard pooled platelet concentrates (PC) or WBC-depleted PC. WBC depletion was produced by an additional centrifugation of pooled PC, with removal of 81% of WBC and an associated platelet loss of 27%. Lymphocytotoxic antibody (LCTAb) levels were monitored as a serologic marker of alloimmunization. Overall, 5 of 25 evaluable patients receiving WBC-depleted PC developed LCTAb, compared to 13/31 receiving standard PC (p = 0.071). There was no significant difference in alloimmunization rate in the subgroup of patients who had no previous exposure to histocompatibility antigens by pregnancy or prior transfusion (4/15 alloimmunized receiving WBC depleted versus 4/12 receiving standard PC). There was no difference in the number of patients in each group who required HLA-matched platelets during induction therapy. In view of the significant loss of platelets with WBC depletion, the expense and difficulty of providing WBC-poor RBC, the absence of impact on the need for HLA-matched platelets during induction, and the small potentiatial benefit from this approach. WBC-depleted platelets should not be utilized to prevent alloimmunization in patients with leukemia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-820
Number of pages6
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1983

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

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