A text message program as a booster to in-person brief interventions for mandated college students to prevent weekend binge drinking

Brian Suffoletto, Jennifer E. Merrill, Tammy Chung, Jeffrey Kristan, Marian Vanek, Duncan B. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate a text message (SMS) program as a booster to an in-person alcohol intervention with mandated college students. Participants: Undergraduates (N = 224; 46% female) who violated an on-campus alcohol policy over a 2-semester period in 2014. Methods: The SMS program sent drinking-related queries each Thursday and Sunday and provided tailored feedback for 6 weeks. Response rates to SMS drinking-related queries and the associations between weekend drinking plans, drinking-limit goal commitment, and alcohol consumption were examined. Gender differences were explored. Results: Ninety percent of SMS queries were completed. Weekend binge drinking decreased over 6 weeks, and drinking-limit goal commitment was associated with less alcohol consumption. Compared with women, men had greater reductions in alcohol consumption when they committed to a drinking-limit goal. Conclusions: Preliminary evidence suggests that an SMS program could be useful as a booster for helping mandated students reduce weekend binge drinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-489
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume64
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 17 2016
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • college student
  • mandated
  • text message

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