Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal malignancies

Randy Shafritz, David S. Feuer, Alan M. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been reported in 5% of males between the ages 65 and 79. The most common malignancies have their highest incidence in the same age group. Coexistence of AAA and malignancy is estimated to be 1-4%. Because of the relative infrequency of the problem, no consensus opinion exists about its management. This article reviews the literature on the subject of AAA and concomitant abdominal malignancies. We describe the current indications and surgical management of AAA, review the population studies describing a link between cancer and AAA, and examine the proposed mechanisms and risk factors behind this association. We also discuss how to determine priority of resection and provide recommendations and guidelines regarding the surgical management of this complex problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-70
Number of pages12
JournalPerspectives in Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Neoplasms
Age Groups
Guidelines
Incidence
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal malignancies",
abstract = "Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) have been reported in 5{\%} of males between the ages 65 and 79. The most common malignancies have their highest incidence in the same age group. Coexistence of AAA and malignancy is estimated to be 1-4{\%}. Because of the relative infrequency of the problem, no consensus opinion exists about its management. This article reviews the literature on the subject of AAA and concomitant abdominal malignancies. We describe the current indications and surgical management of AAA, review the population studies describing a link between cancer and AAA, and examine the proposed mechanisms and risk factors behind this association. We also discuss how to determine priority of resection and provide recommendations and guidelines regarding the surgical management of this complex problem.",
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Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal malignancies. / Shafritz, Randy; Feuer, David S.; Graham, Alan M.

In: Perspectives in Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Vol. 11, No. 2, 01.12.1999, p. 59-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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