Abdominal CT in the staging of small-cell carcinoma of the lung: Incidence of metastases and effect on prognosis

S. E. Mirvis, N. O. Whitley, J. Aisner, M. Moody, M. Whitacre

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    28 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    CT studies of the abdomen performed on 72 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung were retrospectively reviewed to assess the role of abdominal CT in staging. Forty-four of the 72 patients had extensive disease, defined as disease extending beyond the confines of one hemithorax, plus or minus mediastinal or ipsilateral supraclavicular disease or ipsilateral pleural effusion. Initial-staging abdominal CT revealed one or more sites of metastatic disease in 26 (59%) of these 44 patients, while 18 patients had normal initial CT examinations. Statistical analysis of patients with extensive disease revealed a significant increase in complete therapeutic response (p = .0054) and in the length of survival (p = .001) among those who had extensive disease without abdominal metastases as compared with those who had abdominal metastases on their initial abdominal CT examination. The development of new or recurrent abdominal metastases in general or in specific organs on follow-up scans obtained in 35 patients did not significantly decrease their survival time as compared with that of patients without such metastases. Our findings suggest that CT of the abdomen is beneficial in the initial staging of patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung and provides prognostic information concerning response to therapy and length of survival.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)845-847
    Number of pages3
    JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
    Volume148
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1987

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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