Academic achievement among immigrant And U.S.-born Latino adolescents: Associations with cultural, family, and acculturation factors

Catherine Decarlo Santiago, Omar G. Gudiño, Shilpa Baweja, Erum Nadeem

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined proximal risk and protective factors that contribute to academic achievement among 130 Latino students. Participating students were 56.2% female and 35.3% foreign-born (mean age = 11.38, standard deviation = .59). Acculturative stress, immigrant status, child gender, parental monitoring, traditional cultural values, mainstream values, and English language proficiency were explored in relation to academic achievement. Higher levels of parental monitoring, English language proficiency, and female gender were associated with higher grades, while mainstream values were associated with lower grades. In addition, a significant interaction between acculturative stress and immigrant status was found, such that higher acculturative stress was related to poorer grades for U.S.-born students in particular. Thus, parental monitoring and female gender are potential protective factors, while identification with mainstream values and low English language proficiency are risk factors for poor grades. U.S.-born students may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of acculturative stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-747
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

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