Acer rubrum (red maple) growth is negatively affected by soil from forest stands dominated by its invasive congener (Acer platanoides, Norway maple)

Shannon L. Galbraith-Kent, Steven N. Handel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Invasive species continue to alter the plant communities of the eastern United States. To better understand the mechanisms and characteristics associated with invasive success, we studied competition between two Acer species. In a greenhouse, we tested (1) the effect of forest soil type (beneath an invasive and native stand) on seedling growth of the invasive Acer platanoides (Norway maple) and native A. rubrum (red maple), and the (2) effects of full (above- and below-ground) and partial inter-specific competition on species growth. We found A. rubrum growth was negatively affected by soil from the invaded stand, as it had lower above-ground (32%) and below-ground (26%) biomass, and number of leaves (20%) than in the native soil. The root:shoot resource allocations of A. platanoides depended on soil type, as it had 14% greater root:shoot mass allocation in the native soil; this ability to change root:shoot allocation may be contributing to the ecological success of the species. Widely published as having a large ecological amplitude, A. rubrum may be a useful species for ecological restoration where A. platanoides has been present, but the impacts of A. platanoides on soil functioning and subsequent plant interactions must be addressed before protocols for native reintroductions are improved and implemented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-88
Number of pages12
JournalPlant Ecology
Volume213
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Plant Science

Keywords

  • Acer platanoides
  • Acer rubrum
  • Allocation
  • Inter-specific competition
  • Invasive species
  • Soil effects

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