Acknowledging the Impact of Social Forces on Sexual Minority Clients: Introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Practice with LGBTQ Populations

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Abstract

Over the last two to three decades, advances in clinical practice with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals have been extensive. Many clinical social workers now incorporate LGBTQ-affirmative approaches into their practice, and a number of social workers have contributed to the literature on clinical practice with sexual minority clients. Despite these advances, we still require specialized knowledge to understand a number of LGBTQ-related mental health issues. The Clinical Social Work Journal's first special issue on clinical practice with LGBTQ populations emphasizes psychotherapy techniques that acknowledge and also address social forces (e.g., transphobia, homophobia, and heterosexism) that affect the psychosocial functioning of LGBTQ clients. The special issue focuses on LGBTQ populations, such as transgender and bisexual individuals, sexual minority youth, and older adults, and psychotherapy modalities informed by a number of clinical and theoretical approaches. These in-depth articles offer guidance to clinical social workers who need to expand their knowledge of LGBTQ-related mental health issues and also provide those with existing knowledge an opportunity to refine their clinical skills and sharpen their thinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-227
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Social Work Journal
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

  • Clinical social work
  • Gay affirmative practice
  • LGBTQ-affirmative psychotherapy
  • Prejudice and discrimination

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