AFRICAN AMERICAN FEMALE STUDENTS AT HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES: Historical and Contemporary Considerations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the historical and contemporary experiences of Black female students at HBCUs using a gender lens. Issues of racial equality have long received special attention at historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs). However, it was not until the turn of the 20th century that most Black colleges seriously began to provide a college-level, liberal arts education. However, it is important to note that, much like their White counterparts, these women were expected to enroll in home economics courses to complement their academic skills. In the early 1970s, Gunn and hpps completed a research study that sought to understand the advantages and disadvantages gained by Black male and female students at HBCUs. To respect and appreciate the role Black female students have played at Black colleges, it is imperative that we have richer research in this area research that contextualizes these women within the larger Black college context, and smaller, individual investigations that delve deeply into these women's actions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFrom Diplomas to Doctorates
Subtitle of host publicationthe Success of Black Women in Higher Education and its Implications for Equal Educational Opportunities for All
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages73-84
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781000974331
ISBN (Print)9781579223564
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2023
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General Social Sciences

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'AFRICAN AMERICAN FEMALE STUDENTS AT HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES: Historical and Contemporary Considerations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this