Age and Sexual Orientation Moderated the Effects of a Bystander-Focused Interpersonal Violence Prevention Program for High School Students

Emily A. Waterman, Katie M. Edwards, Victoria L. Banyard, Hong Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of the current paper was to identify moderating factors of a bystander-focused violence prevention program for adolescents, Bringing in the Bystander—High School Curriculum. Participants were 2,403 high school students from 25 schools in northern New England (M age = 15.8 years; 50.9% female; 85.1% White, 84.5% heterosexual) who participated in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. We examined impact among different social groups (i.e., by race, gender, age, poverty, sexual orientation) using moderation analyses. The intervention effects for the past 12-month sexual harassment and stalking perpetration were stronger for younger participants and heterosexual participants; poverty, race, and gender did not moderate any program effects. Findings indicate that future prevention research should consider additional targets for older adolescents that may improve intervention program efficacy. An urgent need exists for interventions that are effective for sexual minority adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

  • Bystander
  • Dating violence
  • Interpersonal violence
  • Prevention
  • Sexual assault

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