Agricultural policy as a social engineering tool: A New Jersey case study

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Abstract

This study uses logistic regression to examine the preferences for social engineering policies in the agricultural sector in a New Jersey case study. It finds that farm operators are unlikely to support a policy allowing countries to restrict trade to pursue domestic economic and social policy goals if the policies affect international trade. In particular, it suggests that farm operators with annual gross sales including government payments between $500 000 and $999 999 are 80 percent less likely to indicate such a preference. Farm operators with advanced degrees, some college education, and a high school diploma are also unlikely to indicate such a preference. In contrast, farm operators who receive no income from farming or ranching and those who receive a percentage of family income from farming or ranching indicate that countries should be allowed to restrict trade to pursue domestic economic and social policy goals even if the policies affect international trade.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-263
Number of pages12
JournalReview of Urban and Regional Development Studies
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development

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