Alcohol consumption and lung cancer: A review of the epidemiologic evidence

Elisa Bandera, Jo L. Freudenheim, John E. Vena

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A role for alcohol consumption in lung cancer etiology has been suggested in some studies, but this possible relationship has been often regarded with skepticism, with any indication of an association being attributed to confounding by cigarette smoking. The purpose of this work was to review the epidemiological evidence for an association of alcohol and lung cancer and to identify gaps in that research. The studies reviewed here provide some indication that alcohol and particularly beer intake may increase lung cancer risk after controlling for cigarette smoking. Although the evidence is not conclusive, it warrants additional consideration of alcohol as a risk factor in lung cancer etiology, independent of cigarette smoking. Recommendations for future studies are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)813-821
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume10
Issue number8
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Alcohol Drinking
Lung Neoplasms
Smoking
Alcohols
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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Alcohol consumption and lung cancer : A review of the epidemiologic evidence. / Bandera, Elisa; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Vena, John E.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 10, No. 8, 01.01.2001, p. 813-821.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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