Alterations of Parenchymal Microstructure, Neuronal Connectivity, and Cerebrovascular Resistance at Adolescence after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Development

Maxime Parent, Ying Li, Vijayalakshmi Santhakumar, Fahmeed Hyder, Basavaraju G. Sanganahalli, Sridhar Kannurpatti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity in children. To investigate outcome of early developmental TBI during adolescence, a rat model of fluid percussion injury was developed, where previous work reported deficits in sensorimotor behavior and cortical blood flow at adolescence. 1 Based on the nonlocalized outcome, we hypothesized that multiple neurophysiological components of brain function, namely neuronal connectivity, synapse/axonal microstructural integrity, and neurovascular function, are altered and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods could be used to determine regional alterations. Adolescent outcomes of developmental TBI were studied 2 months after injury, using functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). fMRI-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), representing neural connectivity, was significantly altered between sham and TBI. RSFC strength decreased in the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus, accompanied by decrease in spatial extent of their corresponding RSFC networks and interhemispheric asymmetry. Cerebrovascular reactivity to arterial CO 2 changes diminished after TBI across both hemispheres, with a more pronounced decrease in the ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus, and motor cortex. DTI measures of fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, reporting on axonal and microstructural integrity of the brain, indicated similar interhemispheric asymmetry, with highest change in the ipsilateral hippocampus and regions adjoining the ipsilateral thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala. TBI-induced corpus callosal microstructural alterations indicated measurable changes in interhemispheric structural connectivity. Hippocampus, thalamus, and select cortical regions were most consistently affected in multiple imaging markers. The multi-modal MRI results demonstrate cortical and subcortical alterations in neural connectivity, cerebrovascular resistance, and parenchymal microstructure in the adolescent brain, indicating the highly diffuse and persistent nature of the lateral fluid percussion TBI early in development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)601-608
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of neurotrauma
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2019

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Thalamus
Hippocampus
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Percussion
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
Brain
Corpus Callosum
Anisotropy
Wounds and Injuries
Motor Cortex
Carbon Monoxide
Traumatic Brain Injury
Amygdala
Synapses
Hypothalamus
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Alterations of Parenchymal Microstructure, Neuronal Connectivity, and Cerebrovascular Resistance at Adolescence after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Development",
abstract = "Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity in children. To investigate outcome of early developmental TBI during adolescence, a rat model of fluid percussion injury was developed, where previous work reported deficits in sensorimotor behavior and cortical blood flow at adolescence. 1 Based on the nonlocalized outcome, we hypothesized that multiple neurophysiological components of brain function, namely neuronal connectivity, synapse/axonal microstructural integrity, and neurovascular function, are altered and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods could be used to determine regional alterations. Adolescent outcomes of developmental TBI were studied 2 months after injury, using functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). fMRI-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), representing neural connectivity, was significantly altered between sham and TBI. RSFC strength decreased in the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus, accompanied by decrease in spatial extent of their corresponding RSFC networks and interhemispheric asymmetry. Cerebrovascular reactivity to arterial CO 2 changes diminished after TBI across both hemispheres, with a more pronounced decrease in the ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus, and motor cortex. DTI measures of fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, reporting on axonal and microstructural integrity of the brain, indicated similar interhemispheric asymmetry, with highest change in the ipsilateral hippocampus and regions adjoining the ipsilateral thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala. TBI-induced corpus callosal microstructural alterations indicated measurable changes in interhemispheric structural connectivity. Hippocampus, thalamus, and select cortical regions were most consistently affected in multiple imaging markers. The multi-modal MRI results demonstrate cortical and subcortical alterations in neural connectivity, cerebrovascular resistance, and parenchymal microstructure in the adolescent brain, indicating the highly diffuse and persistent nature of the lateral fluid percussion TBI early in development.",
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Alterations of Parenchymal Microstructure, Neuronal Connectivity, and Cerebrovascular Resistance at Adolescence after Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury in Early Development. / Parent, Maxime; Li, Ying; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Hyder, Fahmeed; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Kannurpatti, Sridhar.

In: Journal of neurotrauma, Vol. 36, No. 4, 15.02.2019, p. 601-608.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity in children. To investigate outcome of early developmental TBI during adolescence, a rat model of fluid percussion injury was developed, where previous work reported deficits in sensorimotor behavior and cortical blood flow at adolescence. 1 Based on the nonlocalized outcome, we hypothesized that multiple neurophysiological components of brain function, namely neuronal connectivity, synapse/axonal microstructural integrity, and neurovascular function, are altered and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods could be used to determine regional alterations. Adolescent outcomes of developmental TBI were studied 2 months after injury, using functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). fMRI-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), representing neural connectivity, was significantly altered between sham and TBI. RSFC strength decreased in the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus, accompanied by decrease in spatial extent of their corresponding RSFC networks and interhemispheric asymmetry. Cerebrovascular reactivity to arterial CO 2 changes diminished after TBI across both hemispheres, with a more pronounced decrease in the ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus, and motor cortex. DTI measures of fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, reporting on axonal and microstructural integrity of the brain, indicated similar interhemispheric asymmetry, with highest change in the ipsilateral hippocampus and regions adjoining the ipsilateral thalamus, hypothalamus, and amygdala. TBI-induced corpus callosal microstructural alterations indicated measurable changes in interhemispheric structural connectivity. Hippocampus, thalamus, and select cortical regions were most consistently affected in multiple imaging markers. The multi-modal MRI results demonstrate cortical and subcortical alterations in neural connectivity, cerebrovascular resistance, and parenchymal microstructure in the adolescent brain, indicating the highly diffuse and persistent nature of the lateral fluid percussion TBI early in development.

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