An analysis of the effectiveness of community notification and registration: Do the best intentions predict the best practices?

Kristen Zgoba, Bonita M. Veysey, Melissa Dalessandro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research measures group differences in recidivism before and after implementation of Megan's Law. The pre-post study consists of a total of 550 male sex offenders released during the years 1990 and 2000, of which 250 offenders were released during 1990 and 1994 (i.e., the pre-Megan's Law group) and 300 offenders were released between 1995 and 2000 (i.e., the post-Megan's Law group). Offenders were released from a general population setting and a sex offender specific treatment facility. The main variables of concern include: (1) recidivism levels, (2) days to first re-arrest, and (3) level of harm (i.e., number of sex offenses, violent offenses, and number of child victims). Statistical findings from chi-square and survival analysis testing indicate significant group differences on levels of general recidivism; however, no significant differences were identified on measures of sex offense recidivism. Implications of these findings on sex offender specific policies are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-691
Number of pages25
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Keywords

  • Megan's Law
  • Notification
  • Recidivism
  • Registration
  • Sex offenders

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