An attentional bias for thin bodies and its relation to body dissatisfaction

Christina Joseph, Vanessa Lobue, Luis Rivera, Jennifer Irving, Sarah Savoy, Maggie Shiffrar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research suggests that humans have an attentional bias for the rapid detection of emotionally valenced stimuli, and that such a bias might be shaped by clinical psychological states. The current research extends this work to examine the relation between body dissatisfaction and an attentional bias for thin/idealized body shapes. Across two experiments, undergraduates completed a gender-consistent body dissatisfaction measure, and a dot-probe paradigm to measure attentional biases for thin versus heavy bodies. Results indicated that men (n = 21) and women (n = 18) show an attentional bias for bodies that correspond to their own gender (Experiment 1), and that high body dissatisfaction among men (n = 69) and women (n = 89) predicts an attentional bias for thin same-gender bodies after controlling for body mass index (BMI) (Experiment 2). This research provides a new direction for studying the attentional and cognitive underpinnings of the relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-223
Number of pages8
JournalBody Image
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Research
Body Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Attentional Bias
Psychology
Direction compound
Feeding and Eating Disorders

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Joseph, Christina ; Lobue, Vanessa ; Rivera, Luis ; Irving, Jennifer ; Savoy, Sarah ; Shiffrar, Maggie. / An attentional bias for thin bodies and its relation to body dissatisfaction. In: Body Image. 2016 ; Vol. 19. pp. 216-223.
@article{bfbb0450cfdc4566914345a5e3a3daf1,
title = "An attentional bias for thin bodies and its relation to body dissatisfaction",
abstract = "Research suggests that humans have an attentional bias for the rapid detection of emotionally valenced stimuli, and that such a bias might be shaped by clinical psychological states. The current research extends this work to examine the relation between body dissatisfaction and an attentional bias for thin/idealized body shapes. Across two experiments, undergraduates completed a gender-consistent body dissatisfaction measure, and a dot-probe paradigm to measure attentional biases for thin versus heavy bodies. Results indicated that men (n = 21) and women (n = 18) show an attentional bias for bodies that correspond to their own gender (Experiment 1), and that high body dissatisfaction among men (n = 69) and women (n = 89) predicts an attentional bias for thin same-gender bodies after controlling for body mass index (BMI) (Experiment 2). This research provides a new direction for studying the attentional and cognitive underpinnings of the relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorders.",
author = "Christina Joseph and Vanessa Lobue and Luis Rivera and Jennifer Irving and Sarah Savoy and Maggie Shiffrar",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bodyim.2016.10.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "216--223",
journal = "Body Image",
issn = "1740-1445",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

An attentional bias for thin bodies and its relation to body dissatisfaction. / Joseph, Christina; Lobue, Vanessa; Rivera, Luis; Irving, Jennifer; Savoy, Sarah; Shiffrar, Maggie.

In: Body Image, Vol. 19, 01.12.2016, p. 216-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An attentional bias for thin bodies and its relation to body dissatisfaction

AU - Joseph, Christina

AU - Lobue, Vanessa

AU - Rivera, Luis

AU - Irving, Jennifer

AU - Savoy, Sarah

AU - Shiffrar, Maggie

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Research suggests that humans have an attentional bias for the rapid detection of emotionally valenced stimuli, and that such a bias might be shaped by clinical psychological states. The current research extends this work to examine the relation between body dissatisfaction and an attentional bias for thin/idealized body shapes. Across two experiments, undergraduates completed a gender-consistent body dissatisfaction measure, and a dot-probe paradigm to measure attentional biases for thin versus heavy bodies. Results indicated that men (n = 21) and women (n = 18) show an attentional bias for bodies that correspond to their own gender (Experiment 1), and that high body dissatisfaction among men (n = 69) and women (n = 89) predicts an attentional bias for thin same-gender bodies after controlling for body mass index (BMI) (Experiment 2). This research provides a new direction for studying the attentional and cognitive underpinnings of the relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorders.

AB - Research suggests that humans have an attentional bias for the rapid detection of emotionally valenced stimuli, and that such a bias might be shaped by clinical psychological states. The current research extends this work to examine the relation between body dissatisfaction and an attentional bias for thin/idealized body shapes. Across two experiments, undergraduates completed a gender-consistent body dissatisfaction measure, and a dot-probe paradigm to measure attentional biases for thin versus heavy bodies. Results indicated that men (n = 21) and women (n = 18) show an attentional bias for bodies that correspond to their own gender (Experiment 1), and that high body dissatisfaction among men (n = 69) and women (n = 89) predicts an attentional bias for thin same-gender bodies after controlling for body mass index (BMI) (Experiment 2). This research provides a new direction for studying the attentional and cognitive underpinnings of the relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorders.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84993945315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84993945315&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bodyim.2016.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.bodyim.2016.10.006

M3 - Article

C2 - 27821295

AN - SCOPUS:84993945315

VL - 19

SP - 216

EP - 223

JO - Body Image

JF - Body Image

SN - 1740-1445

ER -