An electronic microfluidic switch using dielectrophoresis for control of microparticles

Mehdi Javanmard, Sam Emaminejad, Robert Dutton, Ronald W. Davis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

By making use of the advantages offered by micro and nanotechnologies, we aim to develop technologies which will decrease cost, increase assay speed, and improve limit of detection in biomolecular assays. Increasing sensitivity can enable earlier detection, and also can allow for identification of low-abundance markers that are not detectable with current techniques. We have previously developed a microfluidic platform capable of detecting enzyme activity at the attomolar level [1]. In order to transform this technology into a high throughput multiplexed assay, while maintaining low cost, instead of using microfluidic valves which requires extensive tubing and external pumps, it is desirable to achieve fluidic control of microparticles electrically. Using modern VLSI techniques, routing of hundreds or even thousands of electrodes and interconnects on a silicon chip is trivial compared to the requirement of connecting hundreds of tubes to a fluidic chip, which can become a plumbers nightmare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011 - College Park, MD, United States
Duration: Dec 7 2011Dec 9 2011

Publication series

Name2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011

Other

Other2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011
CountryUnited States
CityCollege Park, MD
Period12/7/1112/9/11

Fingerprint

Electrophoresis
Microfluidics
Assays
Switches
Fluidics
Enzyme activity
Tubing
Nanotechnology
Costs
Throughput
Pumps
Silicon
Electrodes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Javanmard, M., Emaminejad, S., Dutton, R., & Davis, R. W. (2011). An electronic microfluidic switch using dielectrophoresis for control of microparticles. In 2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011 [6135210] (2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISDRS.2011.6135210
Javanmard, Mehdi ; Emaminejad, Sam ; Dutton, Robert ; Davis, Ronald W. / An electronic microfluidic switch using dielectrophoresis for control of microparticles. 2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011. 2011. (2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011).
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Javanmard, M, Emaminejad, S, Dutton, R & Davis, RW 2011, An electronic microfluidic switch using dielectrophoresis for control of microparticles. in 2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011., 6135210, 2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011, 2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011, College Park, MD, United States, 12/7/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISDRS.2011.6135210

An electronic microfluidic switch using dielectrophoresis for control of microparticles. / Javanmard, Mehdi; Emaminejad, Sam; Dutton, Robert; Davis, Ronald W.

2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011. 2011. 6135210 (2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Javanmard M, Emaminejad S, Dutton R, Davis RW. An electronic microfluidic switch using dielectrophoresis for control of microparticles. In 2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011. 2011. 6135210. (2011 International Semiconductor Device Research Symposium, ISDRS 2011). https://doi.org/10.1109/ISDRS.2011.6135210