Analysis of the genome of Cyanophora paradoxa: An algal model for understanding primary endosymbiosis

Debashi Bhattacharya, Dana Price, Cheong Xin Chan, Jeferson Gross, Jürgen M. Steiner, Wolfgang Löffelhardt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Algae and plants rely on the plastid (e.g., chloroplast) to carry out photosynthesis. This organelle traces its origin to a cyanobacterium that was captured over a billion years ago by a single-celled protist. Three major photosynthetic lineages (the green algae and plants [Viridiplantae], red algae [Rhodophyta], and Glaucophyta) arose from this primary endosymbiotic event and are putatively united as the Plantae (also known as Archaeplastida). Glaucophytes comprise a handful of poorly studied species that retain ancestral features of the cyanobacterial endosymbiont such as a peptidoglycan cell wall. Testing the Plantae hypothesis and elucidating glaucophyte evolution has in the past been thwarted by the absence of complete genome data from these taxa. Furthermore, multigene phylogenetics has fueled controversy about the frequency of primary plastid acquisitions during eukaryote evolution because these approaches have generally failed to recover Plantae monophyly and often provide conflicting results. Here, we review some of the key insights about Plantae evolution that were gleaned from a recent analysis of a draft genome assembly from Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta). We present results that conclusively demonstrate Plantae monophyly. We also describe new insights that were gained into peptidoglycan biosynthesis in glaucophytes and the carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) in C. paradoxa plastids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEndosymbiosis
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Wien
Pages135-148
Number of pages14
Volume9783709113035
ISBN (Electronic)9783709113035
ISBN (Print)3709113024, 9783709113028
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Cyanophora
Glaucophyta
Plastids
Symbiosis
Plantae
Viridiplantae
symbiosis
Rhodophyta
Peptidoglycan
Genome
genome
plastids
peptidoglycans
Chlorophyta
algae
monophyly
Photosynthesis
Cyanobacteria
Chloroplasts
Eukaryota

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Bhattacharya, D., Price, D., Chan, C. X., Gross, J., Steiner, J. M., & Löffelhardt, W. (2014). Analysis of the genome of Cyanophora paradoxa: An algal model for understanding primary endosymbiosis. In Endosymbiosis (Vol. 9783709113035, pp. 135-148). Springer-Verlag Wien. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1303-5_7
Bhattacharya, Debashi ; Price, Dana ; Chan, Cheong Xin ; Gross, Jeferson ; Steiner, Jürgen M. ; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang. / Analysis of the genome of Cyanophora paradoxa : An algal model for understanding primary endosymbiosis. Endosymbiosis. Vol. 9783709113035 Springer-Verlag Wien, 2014. pp. 135-148
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Bhattacharya, D, Price, D, Chan, CX, Gross, J, Steiner, JM & Löffelhardt, W 2014, Analysis of the genome of Cyanophora paradoxa: An algal model for understanding primary endosymbiosis. in Endosymbiosis. vol. 9783709113035, Springer-Verlag Wien, pp. 135-148. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1303-5_7

Analysis of the genome of Cyanophora paradoxa : An algal model for understanding primary endosymbiosis. / Bhattacharya, Debashi; Price, Dana; Chan, Cheong Xin; Gross, Jeferson; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang.

Endosymbiosis. Vol. 9783709113035 Springer-Verlag Wien, 2014. p. 135-148.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Bhattacharya D, Price D, Chan CX, Gross J, Steiner JM, Löffelhardt W. Analysis of the genome of Cyanophora paradoxa: An algal model for understanding primary endosymbiosis. In Endosymbiosis. Vol. 9783709113035. Springer-Verlag Wien. 2014. p. 135-148 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-7091-1303-5_7