Antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns in leaves of kentucky bluegrass in response to drought and post-drought recovery

Lixin Xu, Liebao Han, Bingru Huang

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63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to examine antioxidant enzyme responses to drought stress and rewatering at both enzymatic activity and transcript levels and to determine the major antioxidant processes associated with drought tolerance and post-drought recovery for a perennial grass species, kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Antioxidant enzyme responses to drought and rewatering in a drought-tolerant cultivar (Midnight) and a drought-sensitive cultivar (Brilliant) were compared in a growth chamber. Plants were exposed to 22 days of drought stress for 'Midnight' and 18 days for 'Brilliant' before rewatering to allow the leaf relative water content (RWC) of both cultivars to drop to the same level. 'Midnight' exhibited higher photochemical efficiency (F v/F m) and lower electrolyte leakage compared with 'Brilliant' when at the same water deficit status (26% to 28% RWC). After 6 days of rewatering, all physiological parameters returned to the control level for 'Midnight', but only F v/F m fully recovered for 'Brilliant'. The transcript level of cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (cyt Cu/Zn SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was significantly higher in 'Midnight' than in 'Brilliant' when exposed to the same level of water deficit (26% to 28% RWC), suggesting that SOD and APX could be involved in scavenging oxidative stress-induced reactive oxygen species in kentucky bluegrass through changes in the level of gene expression. Significantly higher activities of APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, and dehydroascorbate reductase as well as lower lipid peroxidation levels were observed in 'Midnight' versus 'Brilliant' when exposed to drought. However, the activities of SOD, catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD) did not differ between the two cultivars. After 6 days of rewatering, 'Midnight' displayed significantly higher activity levels of CAT, POD, and APX compared with 'Brilliant'. The enzyme activity results indicate that enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathine cycle may play important roles in antioxidant protection to drought damage, whereas CAT, POD, and APX could be associated with better post-drought recovery in kentucky bluegrass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)247-255
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Volume136
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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Poa
Poa pratensis
Droughts
Antioxidants
drought
ascorbate peroxidase
enzyme activity
Ascorbate Peroxidases
Gene Expression
antioxidants
gene expression
Enzymes
superoxide dismutase
leaves
catalase
peroxidase
cultivars
Water
water content
Catalase

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Genetics
  • Horticulture

Cite this

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title = "Antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns in leaves of kentucky bluegrass in response to drought and post-drought recovery",
abstract = "The objectives of this study were to examine antioxidant enzyme responses to drought stress and rewatering at both enzymatic activity and transcript levels and to determine the major antioxidant processes associated with drought tolerance and post-drought recovery for a perennial grass species, kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Antioxidant enzyme responses to drought and rewatering in a drought-tolerant cultivar (Midnight) and a drought-sensitive cultivar (Brilliant) were compared in a growth chamber. Plants were exposed to 22 days of drought stress for 'Midnight' and 18 days for 'Brilliant' before rewatering to allow the leaf relative water content (RWC) of both cultivars to drop to the same level. 'Midnight' exhibited higher photochemical efficiency (F v/F m) and lower electrolyte leakage compared with 'Brilliant' when at the same water deficit status (26{\%} to 28{\%} RWC). After 6 days of rewatering, all physiological parameters returned to the control level for 'Midnight', but only F v/F m fully recovered for 'Brilliant'. The transcript level of cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (cyt Cu/Zn SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was significantly higher in 'Midnight' than in 'Brilliant' when exposed to the same level of water deficit (26{\%} to 28{\%} RWC), suggesting that SOD and APX could be involved in scavenging oxidative stress-induced reactive oxygen species in kentucky bluegrass through changes in the level of gene expression. Significantly higher activities of APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, and dehydroascorbate reductase as well as lower lipid peroxidation levels were observed in 'Midnight' versus 'Brilliant' when exposed to drought. However, the activities of SOD, catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD) did not differ between the two cultivars. After 6 days of rewatering, 'Midnight' displayed significantly higher activity levels of CAT, POD, and APX compared with 'Brilliant'. The enzyme activity results indicate that enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathine cycle may play important roles in antioxidant protection to drought damage, whereas CAT, POD, and APX could be associated with better post-drought recovery in kentucky bluegrass.",
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T1 - Antioxidant enzyme activities and gene expression patterns in leaves of kentucky bluegrass in response to drought and post-drought recovery

AU - Xu, Lixin

AU - Han, Liebao

AU - Huang, Bingru

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N2 - The objectives of this study were to examine antioxidant enzyme responses to drought stress and rewatering at both enzymatic activity and transcript levels and to determine the major antioxidant processes associated with drought tolerance and post-drought recovery for a perennial grass species, kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Antioxidant enzyme responses to drought and rewatering in a drought-tolerant cultivar (Midnight) and a drought-sensitive cultivar (Brilliant) were compared in a growth chamber. Plants were exposed to 22 days of drought stress for 'Midnight' and 18 days for 'Brilliant' before rewatering to allow the leaf relative water content (RWC) of both cultivars to drop to the same level. 'Midnight' exhibited higher photochemical efficiency (F v/F m) and lower electrolyte leakage compared with 'Brilliant' when at the same water deficit status (26% to 28% RWC). After 6 days of rewatering, all physiological parameters returned to the control level for 'Midnight', but only F v/F m fully recovered for 'Brilliant'. The transcript level of cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (cyt Cu/Zn SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) was significantly higher in 'Midnight' than in 'Brilliant' when exposed to the same level of water deficit (26% to 28% RWC), suggesting that SOD and APX could be involved in scavenging oxidative stress-induced reactive oxygen species in kentucky bluegrass through changes in the level of gene expression. Significantly higher activities of APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, and dehydroascorbate reductase as well as lower lipid peroxidation levels were observed in 'Midnight' versus 'Brilliant' when exposed to drought. However, the activities of SOD, catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD) did not differ between the two cultivars. After 6 days of rewatering, 'Midnight' displayed significantly higher activity levels of CAT, POD, and APX compared with 'Brilliant'. The enzyme activity results indicate that enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathine cycle may play important roles in antioxidant protection to drought damage, whereas CAT, POD, and APX could be associated with better post-drought recovery in kentucky bluegrass.

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