Applying communication theories to prevent dangerous drinking among college students: The Ru sure campaign

Lea P. Stewart, Unda C. Lederman, Mark Golubow, Joanne L. Cattafesta, Fern Walter Goodhart, Richard L. Powell, Lisa Laitman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a dangerous drinking prevention campaign on a large university campus. Members of the target audience, first‐year students, are particularly susceptible to misperceptions of drinking norms on campus given their previous experiences and environmental messages communicated to them through the media. Thus, this campaign was designed using the Socially Situated Experiential Learning (SSEL) Model (Lederman & Stewart, 1999) that builds on a framework of interpersonal communication theories, social norms theory, and experiential learning theory. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a health communication campaign that combines both a traditional media campaign with experiential learning activities conducted by upper‐level students who serve as disseminators of campaign messages as well as role models for the target audience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)381-399
Number of pages19
JournalCommunication Studies
Volume53
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

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    Stewart, L. P., Lederman, U. C., Golubow, M., Cattafesta, J. L., Goodhart, F. W., Powell, R. L., & Laitman, L. (2002). Applying communication theories to prevent dangerous drinking among college students: The Ru sure campaign. Communication Studies, 53(4), 381-399. https://doi.org/10.1080/10510970209388599