Are Papers with Open Data More Credible? An Analysis of Open Data Availability in Retracted PLoS Articles

Michael Lesk, Janice Bially Mattern, Heather Moulaison Sandy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Open data has been hailed as an important corrective for the credibility crisis in science. This paper makes an initial attempt to measure the relationship between open data and credible research by analyzing the number of retracted articles with attached or open data in an open access science journal. Using Retraction Watch, retracted papers published in PLoS between 2014 and 2018 are identified. Of the 152 total retracted papers, fewer than 15% attached their data. Since about half of the published articles have open data, and so few of the retracted ones do, we put forth the preliminary notion that open data, especially high quality and well-curated data, might imply scientific credibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationInformation in Contemporary Society - 14th International Conference, iConference 2019, Proceedings
EditorsMichelle H. Martin, Bonnie Nardi, Natalie Greene Taylor, Caitlin Christian-Lamb
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages154-161
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9783030157418
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event14th International Conference on Information in Contemporary Society, iConference 2019 - Washington, United States
Duration: Mar 31 2019Apr 3 2019

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume11420 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference14th International Conference on Information in Contemporary Society, iConference 2019
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityWashington
Period3/31/194/3/19

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Keywords

  • Credibility
  • Open data
  • Retractions

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