Assessment and management of depression and suicidality: Pediatric resident perspectives on training and practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Primary care is a common access point for children and adolescents with depression and suicidality concerns. In this setting, pediatricians typically function as front-line providers given barriers that patients face in accessing mental health clinicians. Method: This study surveyed chief residents from all pediatric residency programs in the United States (N = 214) to evaluate (a) their attitudes, knowledge, practices, and comfort in managing depression and suicidality concerns in primary care, and (b) the relationship between residency training processes and pediatric residents' practices, knowledge, and comfort related to identifying and managing depression and suicidality. Results: The usable response rate was 37.6%. The large majority of respondents are involved in evaluation and management of depression and suicidality; yet many respondents reported a lack of knowledge and comfort in these roles. Conclusions: Recommendations for pediatric residency program training processes are discussed, including the potential added value of colocating mental health clinicians into the primary care continuity training clinic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-183
Number of pages12
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Medical education
  • Pediatrics
  • Suicidality
  • Training

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Assessment and management of depression and suicidality: Pediatric resident perspectives on training and practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this