Asymptomatic rectal colonization with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium difficile among residents of a long-term care facility in New York City

Nishant Prasad, Georges Labaze, Joanna Kopacz, Sophie Chwa, Dimitris Platis, Cynthia X. Pan, Daniel Russo, Vincent J. Labombardi, Giuliana Osorio, Simcha Pollack, Barry N. Kreiswirth, Liang Chen, Carl Urban, Sorana Segal-Maurer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) are at increased risk for colonization and development of infections with multidrug-resistant organisms. This study was undertaken to determine prevalence of asymptomatic rectal colonization with Clostridium difficile (and proportion of 027/NAP1/BI ribotype) or carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in an LTCF population. Methods Active surveillance was performed for C difficile and CRE rectal colonization of 301 residents in a 320-bed (80-bed ventilator unit), hospital-affiliated LTCF with retrospective chart review for patient demographics and potential risk factors. Results Over 40% of patients had airway ventilation and received enteral feeding. One-third of these patients had prior C difficile-associated infection (CDI). Asymptomatic rectal colonization with C difficile occurred in 58 patients (19.3%, one-half with NAP1+), CRE occurred in 57 patients (18.9%), and both occurred in 17 patients (5.7%). Recent CDI was significantly associated with increased risk of C difficile ± CRE colonization. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed presence of tracheostomy collar to be significant for C difficile colonization, mechanical ventilation to be significant for CRE colonization, and prior CDI to be significant for both C difficile and CRE colonization. Conclusions The strong association of C difficile or CRE colonization with disruption of normal flora by mechanical ventilation, enteral feeds, and prior CDI carries important implications for infection control intervention in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)525-532
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae
  • long-term care facility
  • rectal colonization

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