Blood pressure inversely correlates with thrombin-evoked calcium rise in platelets

Jeffrey P. Gardner, Jwa Hwa Cho, Joan H. Skurnick, Girgis Awad, Michael Gutkin, Lawrence H. Byrd, Norman Lasker, Abraham Aviv

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Abstract

Earlier investigations showed a positive correlation between basal cytosolic free calcium in human platelets and blood pressure; however, recent studies have failed to show this relation. We undertook the present work to examine which platelet cytosolic calcium parameters (namely, cytosolic calcium in resting or stimulated states in calcium-containing and calcium- free media) present the least variability and best correlation with blood pressure. We studied 17 healthy white men on three different occasions separated by 1- and 4-week intervals. Their manual and ambulatory automated 24-hour blood pressure measurements were correlated with cytosolic calcium in resting and stimulated (thrombin-treated) fura 2-loaded platelets. The following cytosolic calcium parameters were measured in 1 mmol/L calcium and calcium-free media; basal cytosolic calcium, peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium, and post-transient cytosolic calcium 5 minutes after thrombin treatment. The highest and lowest coefficients of variation were respectively shown by the basal cytosolic calcium (22.8%) and peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium (10.1%) in calcium medium. Basal cytosolic calcium did not correlate with any of the blood pressure parameters. Of the cytosolic calcium parameters, peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium in calcium medium demonstrated consistent (negative) correlations with blood pressure, with better correlations shown with diastolic than systolic blood pressure of both automated and manual blood pressure readings. Peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium in calcium medium showed similar correlations with nighttime and daytime automated blood pressure measurements. There were no correlations between peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium in calcium-free medium and blood pressure. However, the difference between peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium in calcium and calcium-free media showed negative correlations with blood pressure. These findings indicate that basal cytosolic calcium in platelets correlates poorly with blood pressure. The inverse relation between peak thrombin-evoked cytosolic calcium increase and blood pressure suggests enhanced platelet calcium extrusion and/or sequestration capacity with increased blood pressure, probably reflecting an accelerated platelet calcium turnover rate with a higher blood pressure in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)703-709
Number of pages7
JournalHypertension
Volume23
Issue number6 I
StatePublished - Jun 1 1994

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Gardner, J. P., Cho, J. H., Skurnick, J. H., Awad, G., Gutkin, M., Byrd, L. H., Lasker, N., & Aviv, A. (1994). Blood pressure inversely correlates with thrombin-evoked calcium rise in platelets. Hypertension, 23(6 I), 703-709.