Botanical briefs: Phytophotodermatitis is an occupational and recreational dermatosis in the limelight

Simon C. Janusz, Robert A. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Phytophotodermatitis (PPD) is a toxic reaction resulting from contact with a photosensitizing botanical chemical followed by exposure to solar or artificial UV light. It may present with bizarre patterns and linear streaks due to a phototoxic agent splashing onto various cutaneous sites; thus, it affects the skin at points of contact and exposure to UV light. Individuals typically experience symptoms within 24 hours of exposure. Children and adolescents seem particularly prone to developing PPD, as they tend to spend time in the sun and also may come into contact with common irritants such as wild parsley in lawn grass or beverages flavored with lime. However, PPD may be more than a recreational dermatitis; it also may represent a serious occupational dermatosis. In any case, the resultant acute dermatitis may be mild or severe with painful bullae and occasionally is more prominently evident as postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-189
Number of pages3
JournalCutis
Volume107
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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