Building-related illness and employee lost time following application of hot asphalt roof: A call for prevention

Richard M. Lynch, Howard Kipen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Industrial hygiene sampling within an office building during and following a roof renovation revealed low-level exposure to high-boiling organic compounds, associated with complaints of eye and upper respiratory tract irritation among building occupants. Health complaints continued substantially beyond the time frame of the renovation completion, despite a lack of objective industrial hygiene findings for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and microbiological contamination, and a lack of consistent medical findings among employees evaluated by an occupational physician. An analysis of employee attendance records suggests lost attendance and reduced productivity costs. Preventive strategies include proper planning and scheduling of building renovations to prevent employee exposure to asphalt roof emissions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-868
Number of pages12
JournalToxicology and Industrial Health
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Keywords

  • Asphalt fumes
  • Building-related illness
  • Indoor air quality
  • Volatile organic compounds

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