Cardiovascular outcomes after preeclampsia or eclampsia complicated by myocardial infarction or stroke

Mary Downes Gastrich, Sampada K. Gandhi, John Pantazopoulos, Edith A. Zang, Nora M. Cosgrove, Javier Cabrera, Jeanine E. Sedjro, Gloria Bachmann, John Kostis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between preeclampsia or eclampsia and stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), subsequent cardiovascular outcomes, and long-term survival. METHODS: Using the Myocardial Infarction Data Acquisition System in New Jersey (1994-2009), we analyzed cardiovascular outcomes in women with and without preeclampsia or eclampsia and a first MI or stroke but with a hospitalization for a first MI or stroke (analysis 1: MI case group, n=57; MI control group, n=155; stroke case group, n=132; stroke control group, n=379). We also compared these outcomes in women with preeclampsia or eclampsia and a first MI or stroke during pregnancy with women with preeclampsia or eclampsia without MI or stroke during pregnancy (analysis 2: MI case group, n=23; MI control group, n=67; stroke case group, n=90; stroke control group, n=263). A subsequent occurrence of MI, stroke, and cardiovascular death, as well as a combined cardiovascular outcome, was ascertained. RESULTS: In analysis 1, women with preeclampsia or eclampsia were at significantly lower risk for combined cardiovascular outcome with all deaths (frequency of outcome 16.7%) and with cardiovascular deaths (10.6%) compared with women without preeclampsia or eclampsia after a first stroke (33.8% and 23.5%, respectively). In analysis 2, women with preeclampsia or eclampsia and a first stroke during admission were at significantly higher risk of all death (11.1%) and the combined cardiovascular outcome with all deaths (11.1%) compared with women with preeclampsia or eclampsia without a stroke (1.9% and 2.7%, respectively) during that admission. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that preeclampsia or eclampsia not complicated by MI or stroke during pregnancy may not confer a very high risk for subsequent MI and stroke in up to 16 years of follow-up. Our data suggest that other known risk factors put women at greater risk for stroke than preeclampsia or eclampsia complicated by a stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)823-831
Number of pages9
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume120
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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