Categorization in Neuroscience: Brain Response to Objects and Events

Catherine Hanson, Stephen José Hanson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the work that has applied the techniques of cognitive neuroscience to the study of category processing. It examines what the studies using a neuroscience approach have contributed to the understanding of how categories are learned and represented. It provides some examples of how neuroscientific approaches have contributed to the understanding about the processing of category knowledge in the brain. The chapter focuses on two types of knowledge about the world, namely, objects and actions. Most work on categorization concerns how object categories are represented and learned. It is clear that category learning and representation requires interaction between a number of brain areas that constitute processes of other complex cognitive functions like language, executive function, and attention. Future understanding of basic cognitive processes will likely engage both object and event representations to determine the nature of fundamental brain processes underlying these common complex categorization functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Categorization in Cognitive Science
PublisherElsevier Ltd
Pages119-140
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9780080446127
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Hanson, C., & Hanson, S. J. (2005). Categorization in Neuroscience: Brain Response to Objects and Events. In Handbook of Categorization in Cognitive Science (pp. 119-140). Elsevier Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-008044612-7/50060-3